We are talking Codename: COYOTE!! A new modern day marvel....that's taking the Mustang to new levels!!




Many thousands of dyno hours are required to develop a new engine, a process that continues 24 hours a day, typically six days per week. This Coyote is in one of the more standard eddy current dyno cells; others are specialized with freezing water supplies or acoustic walls for sound tests, immense air conditioners and heaters for climate studies, and so on.

Read more: http://www.mustang50magazine.com/techarticles/m5lp_1003_2011_ford_mustang_gt_50_coyote_engine/photo_02.html#ixzz27Zzxw1c5



WHY NAMED "COYOTE?"

Ford’s new version of the 302 destined for the ’11 Mustang was referred to as the Coyote. We’re told the name was picked internally from Ford employees’ suggestions and was intended to pay homage to A.J. Foyt and his Coyote Indy cars. However, now that the engine is in production Ford refers to it as the 5.0L Ti-VCT, but the codename Coyote stuck, and is now the name of choice to this day!!

WHAT IS IT?


Regardless of what it’s called, this new engine is one trick piece. With a bore of 3.629 inches and a stroke of 3.649, displacement is roughly 302 ci or 5.0 liters (nitpickers can do the math). Weighing in at a scant 444 pounds it churns out 412 hp at 6,500 rpm, 390 lb-ft of torque at 4,250 rpm, and in the new Mustang it’s rated at 17/26 mpg city/highway with a six-speed manual, and 18/25 with the automatic so every number it makes is impressive. Apparently, you can run this Coyote engine all day at 7,300 rpm (As per Ford & hello above photo - extensive dyno testing ref)



The new engine had to remain close to the same physical size of the outgoing 4.6, and share other specifications with the Modular family, such as bore spacing, deck height, bell housing bolt pattern, etc.
The result was the 5.0 Coyote, which produced roughly the same amount of power as its current industry competitors, but with a much smaller displacement.



WHAT DOES "WIKI" - WIKIPEDIA HAVE TO SAY ABOUT IT?

The 5.0 L (4951 cc, 302 cid)[9] "Coyote" V8 is the latest evolution of the Modular engine.[10] As the existing 4.6L Modular approached the end of its development cycle, Ford engineers needed to design a new V8, specifically for the Mustang GT, that would compete with the GM 6.2L LS3 used in the new Chevrolet Camaro, and the new Chrysler 6.4L Hemi ESF in the Charger and Challenger. The new engine had to remain close to the same physical size of the outgoing 4.6, and share other specifications with the Modular family, such as bore spacing, deck height, bell housing bolt pattern, etc. The result was the 5.0 Coyote, which produced roughly the same amount of power as its competitors, but with a much smaller displacement. To achieve the same size and weight as the 4.6, a cylinder block with thin walls was used. To strengthen it enough to handle increased output, webbing was extensively used as reinforcement in the casting, rather than increasing the thickness of the walls. The intake plenum was also situated low between the two cylinder banks to meet the height constraint, thus the alternator traditionally placed low and center was moved to the side of the engine. It shares the 4.6 L's 100 mm (3.937 in) bore spacing and 227 mm (8.937 in) deck height,[11] while bore diameter and stroke have increased to 92.2mm (3.629 in) and 92.7mm (3.649 in), respectively. The engine also retains the 4.6 L's 150.7 mm (5.933 in) connecting rod length, which produces a 1.62:1 rod to stroke ratio.[12] The firing order has been changed from that shared by all previous Modular V8s (1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8) to that of the Ford Flathead V8 (1-5-4-8-6-3-7-2).[12] Compression ratio is 11.0:1, and despite having indirect fuel injection (as opposed to direct injection) the engine can still be run on 87 octane gasoline.

The Coyote features all new 4V DOHC cylinder heads that have shifted the camshafts outboard, which allowed for a compact roller finger follower setup with remote hydraulic valve lash adjusters and improved (raised) intake port geometry. The result is an intake port that outflows the Ford GT intake port by 4 percent and the Yates D3 (NASCAR) intake port up to 0.472" (12 mm) lift, which is the maximum lift of the Coyote's intake cams.[12] Engine redline is 7000 rpm.

The Coyote is Ford's first implementation of its cam-torque-actuated (CTA) Twin Independent Variable Cam Timing (Ti-VCT) in a V8 engine, which allows the power-train control module (PCM) to advance and retard intake and exhaust cam timing independently of each other, providing improved power, fuel economy and reduced emissions. The engine is assembled in Ford's Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario, using existing Modular tooling.[13]

NOTE: the Coyote released in Australia with SOHC 2 valves per cyl. Ford Australia refused to update thier computers to run 4 cams, they utilise the same twin cam computer from the Ford inline 6 for the twin cam 5.0L V8. Also I think the bore stroke sizes on here are a slight bit different, I cannot be sure but I think stroke was 91.2mm and bore 92.7mm. (Dr. Brendan Cooke M.D.Hon, Biological and Mechanical Engineer)

The Coyote is available as a crate motor from Ford Racing Performance Parts (FRPP) complete with alternator, manifold, and wiring harness in standard 412 bhp (307 kW; 418 PS) configuration. The Coyote Boss 302 is also available from FRPP for a premium over the standard 5.0L.

Vehicles equipped with the 32-valve DOHC Ti-VCT 5.0 L include the following:


  • 2011-2012 Ford Mustang GT, 412 hp (307 kW) @ 6500 rpm, 390 lb·ft (529 N·m) @ 4250 rpm
  • 2011 Ford F-Series, 360 hp (268 kW) @ 5500 rpm, 380 lb·ft (515 N·m) @ 4250 rpm [20]
  • 2011 Ford Falcon GT,[21][22] Supercharged, 449 hp (335 kW) @ 5750 rpm, 420 lb·ft (569 N·m) @ 2200-5500 rpm[17]
  • 2012–Present Ford Mustang Boss 302, 444 hp (331 kW) @ 7500 rpm, 380 lb·ft (515 N·m) @ 4500 rpm [15][23]
  • 2013–Present Ford Mustang GT, 420 hp (313 kW) @ 6500 rpm, 390 lb·ft (529 N·m) @ 4250 rpm [24]


Wiki's direct website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Modular_engine#5.0.C2.A0L_Coyote